Cafés and Literature – Past and Present

Gold level

Published on 10/28/2012

Learning objectives

  • Art and literature
  • Cultural history
  • Sociology
Created for

Ages 14 - 18

Subject

Digital/Media Literacy

History

Language arts and literacy

Social Studies

Technology/ICT

Twenty-first century skills

World Languages

21st Century Skills

Collaboration

Communication

Knowledge building & critical thinking

ICT for learning

Problem solving & innovation (creativity)

Student self-assessment

Featured tools
AutoCollage
Microsoft Powe...
Microsoft Word
Skype
Windows 7
Windows Movie ...

Windows® Live ...

Wikis by Wetpaint

Facebook Group

Google Documents

Polldaddy

Picasa

Box.net

Slideshare

Required hardware

PC

Phone

Instructional approach

Project based learning (PBL)

Direct instruction

Independent study

Learning activity details

The project lasted for more than four weeks with students in their final year taking part. Our theme was on the one hand historical, a look at cafes more than a hundred years ago at the turn of the 20th century, with literary and cultural history research. On the other hand, it’s a contemporary research job looking at whether there is life in cafes today and if there is what kind. The students used books and internet sources for the historical research. For the contemporary aspect they used interviews as sources. The students worked in groups, a class of thirty-four in seven groups. They used a lot of ICT tools, online with shared documents, comments, sharing knowledge within and outside the groups. They also made a joint photo album. The presentation is the end product which we also share on wikis.

Supporting resources

Sign in to view or download resources
Why do I need to sign in? Microsoft respects your privacy. A global community, the Microsoft Educator Network asks you to sign in to participate in discussions, access free technology tools, download thousands of learning activies, take online learning or connect with colleague.

Comments (0)

Sign in to view or post comments
Why do I need to sign in? Microsoft respects your privacy. A global community, the Microsoft Educator Network asks you to sign in to participate in discussions, access free technology tools, download thousands of learning activies, take online learning or connect with colleague.