Sports and politics-- the story of cricket

Gold level

Published on 2/19/2012

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Learning objectives

  • 1. . The project would familiarize the students with the idea that – 2. Cricket remained limited to countries that had once been part of the
  • 3. The changes which evolved with the game
  • 4. Advancement in technology, especially television technology, has affected the development of contemporary cricket by broadening the viewe
Created for

Ages 14 - 18

Subject

History

Social Studies

21st Century Skills

Collaboration

Communication

Knowledge building & critical thinking

ICT for learning

Problem solving & innovation (creativity)

Student self-assessment

Featured tools
Microsoft Powe...

Microsoft Tag

Windows 7
Required hardware

PC

Tablet

Phone

Electronic white board

Instructional approach

Project based learning (PBL)

Independent study

Learning activity details

Studying history is fascinating. It becomes all the more interesting, if it happens to be through a game; such as CRICKET. Organization of cricket matches brings different nations closer and establishes friendship. Cricketers are often seen as ambassadors of the Country. The game was invented in England and is linked to nineteenth century Victorian society culture. Cricket spread to the colonies with the British. It has come to be linked up with the politics of colonialism and nationalism. How much complex was the history of the game within the colonies? To what extent had it been connected to the politics of caste and region, community and nation? How has this game emerged as a national game with decades of historical development?

Supporting resources

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